Wednesday, October 18, 2017

CFP: EBHS 2018

The 43rd Economic and Business History Society (EBHS) Annual Conference will be held at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, on May 30-June 2, 2018. The general theme is "Early Modern Origins of Growth and Business." However, proposals for presentations on any aspect of ancient to recent economic, social or business history are welcome, as are proposals for whole panels. Submissions from graduate students and non-academic affiliates are encouraged.
    Proposals should include an abstract of no more than 500 words and contact details. The deadline for submission of proposals is February 15, 2018. Proposals may be submitted through the EBHS website at www.ebhsoc.org (or by email to ebhs2018@ebhsoc.org). Please consult the complete call for papers for more details about the meeting and submission procedures.
    Questions should be addressed to Program Chair Olli Turunen, oturunen@wisc.edu, or EBHS 2018 President Jari Eloranta, elorantaj@appstate.edu.


Monday, October 16, 2017

CFP: Special Issue of Management and Organizational History on “ Making Managers”

The journal Management and Organizational History has issued a call for papers for a special issue on "Making Managers." Guest editors are Rolv Petter Amdam, Mathias Kipping, and Jacqueline McGlade. They state:
The issue intends to fill an important gap in the current literature on the history of management education, which has largely been centered on organizational development narratives, i.e. the rise of business schools, the global spread of the American model, business-based academic disciplines, etc. We therefore invite papers that to chronicle the actual preparation of managers in all types, venues and forms; address questions and perspectives that have not been addressed; and cover geographical areas or industries and activities that are not in focus in the extant literature.
For a much fuller explanation of possible topics and the submission process, please see the journal website. The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2018.


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Digital Resource: Business History Explorer

Business History Explorer (BHE) is a bibliography covering the history of UK businesses and the industries to which they belong. At the end of 2016 it contained c45,000 entries. Its prime purpose is to assist researchers in locating historical information about specific businesses. The bibliography includes monographs, periodical articles, theses, chapters in multi-author works, unpublished works, and selected product and employment literature. The database is being continuously updated in order to include new publications and to plug gaps in the existing constituency. According to the project website, "Many gaps remain in periodical article coverage and priority is being given in 2017 to addressing this."
    One can search the database to get a sense of the contents without charge, but viewing the results returned requires payment of an annual fee, substantially discounted for BAC members and affiliates.
       The BHE is the successor to Francis Goodall, A Bibliography of British Business Histories, published in 1987. The work in gathering information for the present bibliography has been undertaken by John Orbell with Richard Storey. It is supported by the British Archives Council.


Monday, October 9, 2017

And More Business Historians in the News

News about and by historians of business continues to pop up in the general media. [Note that some of these links may lead to material that is gated, but readers with access to university or public libraries should be able to gain entry.]
In an opinion piece in the wake of the Google employee memo about gender in the industry, Marie Hicks drew on her recent research to write "Women were foundational to the field of computing" for the Washington Post.

Marc Levinson wrote an op-ed in the New York Times on "Can Amazon Be the Next Apple?"

Josh Lauer appeared on NPR's Marketplace, discussing his new book, Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America.

An essay on the Bank of England blog on Britain's early efforts to finance the First World War, written by Michael Anson, Norma Cohen, Alastair Owens and Daniel Todman, received widespread coverage in the UK press; see, for example, the Financial Times.

Ed Balleisen's Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff continues to attract media attention; see Katherine Epstein, “Deconstructing Fraud,” The American Interest, and Brooke Harrington, “Why Americans Get Conned Again and Again,” The Atlantic. There is also a podcast discussion of the book between Balleisen and David Burch on the latter's podcast site.

Julia Ott wrote an extended review essay of Robert Gordon's The Rise and Fall of American Growth for the online site Public Books.

The Washington Post featured a discussion of the The Negro Motorist Green-Book.

Robert Wright can be found on C-Span talking about Alexander Hamilton's views on the national debt, under the auspices of the Museum of American Finance. 

Noam Maggor's Brahmin Capitalism was reviewed by John Steele Gordon for the Wall Street Journal.

 A large contingent of historians, including Dael Norwood, contributed to a two-part story on WBUR's online site, "Commonwealth," "How Profits From Opium Shaped 19th-Century Boston."

Friday, October 6, 2017

CFP: “Contextualizing Bankruptcy”

The Institut historique allemand in Paris is holding a two-day workshop on March 19-20, 2018, on the subject "Contextualizing Bankruptcy: Publicity, Space and Time (Europe, 17th to 19th c.)." The organizers [Natacha Coquery (LARHRA, Lyon 2, IUF); Jürgen Finger (DHI Paris); Mark Sven Hengerer (LMU Munich)] write in their call for papers:
Although bankruptcy is a rather exceptional situation in the life of a merchant, it has explanatory power for routines of economic stakeholders. Considering the long, non-uniform and unsteady transition from merchant capitalism to industrial and financial capitalism, we suggest to start a dialog between modernistes and contemporanéistes. The workshop focuses on the various forms of contextualizing business failure and puts forward three major research axes: Covering and uncovering/secrecy and publicity; economic space and area of jurisdiction; temporal narratives of (in)solvency.
Those interested in presenting should send an abstract of the presentation (max. 500 words) and a short biographical note (1/2 page) with a list of relevant publications to jfinger@dhi-paris.fr by the deadline of October 31, 2017.
    For a much more extended discussion of the workshop topic, please see the complete call for papers.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Blogs of Interest

A number of history organizations and groups now publish active and informative blogs, which often include material of interest to business and economic historians. A (far from comprehensive) sampling:
American Antiquarian Society: Past Is Present
American Historical Association: AHA Today
Centre for Imperial and Global History, Exeter: Imperial & Global Forum  
Economic History Society: The Long Run
Global Urban History
Hagley Library and Museum: Research and Collection News
Legal History Blog 
National Museum of American History, O Say Can You See? (filtered for business history)
New-York Historical Society: From the Stacks  
Organization of American Historians: Process
Organizational History Network
Society for Historians of the Early Republic (SHEAR): The Panorama
The Junto (early Americanists)
Urban History Association: The Metropole 
In addition, several individual historians manage blogs of interest:
Ed Ayers, et al., Bunk: Rewiring American History
Ken Lipartito, In the Age of Trump
Stephen Mihm blogs regularly at the Bloomberg View
Andrew Smith, The Past Speaks
John Turner, Finance: Past, Present, and Future
Robert E. Wright, Finance: History and Policy

Monday, October 2, 2017

Program Available: Hagley Conference on “Hidden Capitalism”

On November 10, 2017, the Hagley Museum and Library will offer a conference on "Hidden Capitalism: Beyond, Below, and Outside the Visible Market." The conference was initiated by Lisa Jacobson (UC Santa Barbara) and Ken Lipartito (Florida International University); they were joined on the program committee by Roger Horowitz (Hagley Museum and Library) and Wendy Woloson (Rutgers University). Session titles are: "Business in the shadows"; "Liminal spaces and global order";"Capitalisms in collision"; and "Regulating alternative markets."
    For additional information, please contact Carol Lockman at clockman@hagley.org.


Friday, September 29, 2017

Reminder: BHC Doctoral Colloquium Deadline Approaching

The 2018 BHC Doctoral Colloquium in Business History will be held in conjunction with the BHC annual meeting. This prestigious workshop, funded by Cambridge University Press, will take place in Baltimore on Wednesday, April 4, and Thursday, April 5. Typically limited to ten students, the colloquium is open to early stage doctoral candidates pursuing dissertation research within the broad field of business history, from any relevant discipline and from any country. Topics may range from the early modern era to the present, and explore societies across the globe. Participants work intensively with a distinguished group of BHC-affiliated scholars (including at least two BHC officers), discussing dissertation proposals, relevant literatures and research strategies, and career trajectories.
     Applications, due by November 15, 2017 via email to BHC@Hagley.org, should include: a statement of interest; CV; preliminary or final dissertation prospectus (10-15 pages); and a letter of support from the dissertation supervisor (or prospective supervisor). Questions about the colloquium should be sent to its director, Edward Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu. All participants receive a stipend that partially defrays travel costs to the annual meeting.  Applicants will receive notification of the selection committee’s decisions by December 20, 2017.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Book Reviews of Interest

A selection of recent (ungated) reviews of books in business and economic history:
Charles Thompson reviews Nicolas Barreyre, Gold and Freedom: The Political Economy of Reconstruction, for Reviews in History.

Aaron L. Chin reviews Gautham Rao, National Duties: Custom Houses and the Making of the American State for Common-Place.

John Kampfner reviews David Kynaston, Till Time’s Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England, 1694-2013 for The Guardian.

Bernard Attard reviews Marc Flandreau, Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange: A Financial History of Victorian Science for EH.Net.

Larry Neal reviews Youssef Cassis, Richard S. Grossman, and Catherine R. Schenk, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Banking and Financial History for EH.Net.

Jean-Pierre Dormois reviews Robert Gordon, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, for Books & Ideas.net.

Erik Benson reviews Richard R. John and Kim Phillips-Fein, eds., Capital Gains: Business and Politics in Twentieth-Century America for EH.Net.

David González Agudo reviews Rafael Torres Sánchez, Military Entrepreneurs and the Spanish Contractor State in the Eighteenth Century for EH.Net. The book is also reviewed by Jobie Turner for H-War.

Lynne Kiesling reviews John L. Neufeld, Selling Power: Economics, Policy, and Electric Utilities before 1940 for EH.Net.

Michael Haupert reviews James W. Cortada, All the Facts: A History of Information in the United States since 1870 for EH.Net.

Anne L. Murphy reviews Ranald C. Michie, British Banking: Continuity and Change from 1694 to the Present for EH.Net.

Joshua Friedman reviews Adam Teller and Rebecca Kobrin, eds. Purchasing Power: The Economics of Modern Jewish History for H-Judaic.

Martin Bemman reviews Hartmut Berghoff and Adam Rome, eds., Green Capitalism? Business and the Environment in the Twentieth Century for H-Soz-u-Kult [in German].

Gayle K. Brunelle reviews Jutta Wimmler, The Sun King's Atlantic: Drugs, Demons and Dyestuffs in the Atlantic World, 1640-1730 for H-Atlantic.

Sean Seyer reviews Molly W. Berger, Hotel Dreams: Luxury, Technology, and Urban Ambition in America, 1829-1929 for H-USA.

Nate Holdren reviews Elizabeth Anderson, Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk about It), and Chad Pearson, Reform or Repression: Organizing America's Anti-Union Movement for History News Network.

Anthony Swift reviews Robert Rydell, ed., World's Fairs: A Global History of Exhibitions for Reviews in History.

Helen Paul reviews Amy Froide, Silent Partners: Women as Public Investors during Britain’s Financial Revolution, 1690-1750 for Reviews in History.


Monday, September 25, 2017

CFP: Richard Robinson Workshop in Business History 2018

The 3rd biennial Richard Robinson Workshop on Business History will take place at Portland State University on May 24-26, 2018. The theme for the meeting will be "Risk, Honor & Innovation: Imagining New Markets." According to the call for papers:
The market, market-relations, and the marketplace, have become key markers of what is forward-looking and progress-oriented in modern societies. These markers delineated an impersonal sphere of scientific, technical and agentless activities whose workings seemingly lay outside the realm of desires and emotions. Our workshop seeks to break down the divide between the impersonal (effects of technical limits and aggregations of large numbers) and the subjective (articulations of perceptions, fears, and self-regard) in the ways “the market” and “the economy” are conceived. We aim to reconsider market and business activities in light of both the techniques and the emotional vectors that infuse them.
The organizers are looking for "business histories (broadly construed) that tackle this intersection of desire, norms and markets in a variety of ways from all time periods and places," and they particularly encourage "proposals on global, transnational, and non-Western topics and on developments before the twentieth century." For a much fuller discussion of possible topics, please see the full call for papers.
    Paper proposals, consisting of a one-page CV and a 500-word abstract, should be sent to the workshop organizers, Thomas Luckett (Portland State University), Chia Yin Hsu (Portland State University), and Erika Vause (Florida Southern College), at psu.business.history. workshop@gmail.com by November 15, 2017

Friday, September 22, 2017

Schedules: Fall 2017 Workshops and Seminars of Interest

As the new academic year begins, we once more offer a round-up of ongoing workshops, forums, and discussion groups in business and economic history. Please check each website for more detailed information. Some groups, particularly those in non-US universities, may not yet have posted Fall 2017 information; in those cases, a link to the home site or last available listing is included.
     In addition to their value for those able to participate directly, these groups often maintain mailing lists and sometimes make speakers' papers freely available.
Business History Seminar, Harvard Business School (scroll down)
Business History @ Erasmus Seminars
Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society (Hagley) Research Seminars
Centre for Business History Seminar, Copenhagen Business School
Columbia University Seminar in Economic History
Economic History Seminar, LSE
Economic History Seminar, Stern School of Business, NYU
Economic History Workshop, Stanford University
Economic and Social History of the Early Modern World, IHR, University of London
Economic and Social History Seminar, Utrecht University (scroll down)
Harvard Economic History Workshop
History and Economics Seminar, Harvard University
International and Global History Forum, Harvard University
Newberry Seminar on the History of Capitalism
Northwestern Economic History Workshop
Paris School of Economics, Economic History Seminar
PEAES Fellows Colloquium and Seminars, Library Company of Philadelphia
Penn Economic History Forum
Political Economy of Modern Capitalism Workshop, Harvard University
Queen's University (Ontario) Economic History Workshop
Queen's University (Belfast) Centre for Economic History Workshop
Seminar on the History of American Capitalism, Johns Hopkins University
Seminars in Economic and Social History, University of Cambridge
Vanderbilt University Economic History Workshop
Von Gremp Workshop in Economic and Entrepreneurial History, UCLA
Washington (D.C.) Area Economic History Seminar
Yale Economic History Workshop
In addition, the following seminars, though not specifically focused on business or economic history, often have papers of interest:
McNeil Center for Early American Studies
Omohundro Institute Colloquium

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

EBHA Summer School

Every other year, the European Business History Association (EBHA) sponsors a Doctoral Summer School; the 2017 edition was held in Ancona, Italy in early September. Adam Nix has written a report about the meetings for the Organizational History Network blog. As he explains,
the school constitutes the EBHA’s main effort in their aim to develop the academic discipline of business history. The school seeks to attract talented junior historians and social scientists to the broad scope of business history, encouraging further study of the history of organizations, markets and the people impacted by them. The school, fundamentally international in nature, has developed a reputation for facilitating long lasting friendships within the field and providing a safe, friendly, but ultimately rigorous atmosphere within which to promote and engage with doctoral research.
Keynote speakers were Franco Amatori (Bocconi University), Harold James (Princeton University), and Grietjie Verhoef (University of Johannesburg); faculty members were Marten Boon (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), Ludovic Cailluet (EDHEC Business School), Andrea Colli (Bocconi University), Abe de Jong (Rotterdam School of Management), Jeffrey Fear (University of Glasgow), Andrea Schneider (Gesellschaft für Unternehmensgeschichte), and Ben Wubs (Erasmus University).
    EBHS president Ludovic Cailluet emphasizes that the school is open to all nationalities, and he encourages North American students to apply when information about the 2019 session becomes available.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Business History/Historians at the 2018 AHA: Program Available

The 2018 annual meeting of the American Historical Association (AHA) will take place in Washington, D.C., on January 4-7. The program has now been posted online at the meeting website.
    The Business History Conference has three sponsored events as an AHA-affiliated society: two sessions and a luncheon:
Session 73: "Ideologies of Industrialization in the Early American Republic"
[No session number]: "Peddling Print in 19th-Century America: Subscription Publishing as a Business Model"
BHC Luncheon: "Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism: Perspectives from Business History"
In addition, many other sessions feature business history and historians. The AHA program site allows users to search for papers in a variety of ways, including key words; searches on "business" and "capital" return dozens of papers--too many to list here. A few of particular interest:
Session 19: "Knowledge Production and Economic Life in the Long Gilded Age"
Session 150: "Race, Risk, and Capitalism in the Twentieth-Century United States"
Session 159: "Teaching Capitalism"
Session 193: "Records and Revolutions: The Music Industry as an Agent of Change"
Session 228: "Revolutionaries, Refugees, and Smugglers: New Directions in Inter-American Exchanges during the Age of Revolution"
Session 266: "The US Military as an Economic Institution since World War II"
Session 274: "Black Economic Internationalism in the 20th Century"



Friday, September 15, 2017

Research Source: Sarnoff Collection at Hagley Opens

After three years of processing, preserving, and cataloging, Hagley Library announced this week that the contents of the David Sarnoff Library collection are now fully available to the public, including 700 digital images available through the Hagley Digital Archives. The collection includes thousands of linear feet of documents, reports, photographs, films, and publications detailing the rise and fall of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and of Sarnoff, its longtime leader.
    In December 2013, Hagley Library was awarded a $291,500 grant by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to process and make accessible the collections of the David Sarnoff Library. Employing two project archivists, Daniel Michelson and Kenneth Cleary, a number of graduate assistants and interns from the University of Delaware, and occupying a number of its library staff, Hagley completed the David Sarnoff Library Processing Project in May 2017.
    “Hagley is proud of its work to preserve this collection documenting an iconic and innovative American business and the man who led that business for multiple decades,” said Erik Rau, director of library services at Hagley. “The collection includes materials donated by more than one hundred individuals and companies resulting in tens of thousands of individually cataloged reports and publications. We invite the public to explore this incredible collection on our website and at the library.”
    In the early 1960s, Sarnoff opened a library in the David Sarnoff Research Center in Princeton, N.J., to house his private papers and focus on his contributions to the communications and electronics industries; the David Sarnoff Collection (as it was then known) opened in late September 1967. The collection developed further with the acquisition of papers of former RCA executives, scientists, and engineers. However, the Sarnoff Corporation closed the library in 2009, following the onset of the Great Recession. Hagley obtained the Sarnoff Collection records shortly thereafter.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Reminder: BHC 2018 Proposals Due October 2

We remind everyone that the deadline for submissions to the program committee for the 2018 Business History Conference annual meeting is October 2, 2017. The meeting will be held on April 5-7, 2018, in Baltimore, Maryland. The theme will be "Money, Finance, and Capital." For the full call for papers and additional information about paper competitions, the dissertation session, and BHC policies, please see the BHC Annual Meeting website.

Monday, September 11, 2017

CFP: Research Competition on US Scientists and Engineers in World War I

David Hounshell of Carnegie Mellon University, who is serving as chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on World War I and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) /National Research Council (NRC): A Research Competition, sends word of a scholarly competition for younger researchers. He writes,
the committee is pleased to announce an open competition for scholars under the age of 30 to research and write a scholarly paper on a major aspect of how scientists and engineers in the United States were engaged in the World War I effort. The focus, drawing on the NAS’s creation of the National Research Council as a response to the United States’ expected involvement in World War I, is on institutional changes (e.g., the charter of the NRC) and the research enterprise in America. In effect, scholars should look at how the war experience shaped long-term relationships among scientists and engineers and U.S. policymakers regarding national security and public welfare. The winner of the competition will be awarded a $10,000 prize.
Please note that a research grant in the amount of $5,000 will be available to five scholars who submit the most compelling proposals prior to December 1, 2017. Additional information about the competition, as well as the formal request for proposals, may be found on the competition website.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

CFP: SHEAR 2018

The 40th annual meeting of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR) will take place on July 18-22, 2018, in Cleveland, Ohio. The program committee invites proposals for sessions and papers exploring all aspects of and approaches to the history and culture of the early American republic, c. 1776-1861. Particularly encouraged are submissions that
  • reflect the diversity of the past, but also address the most pressing issues of the present;
  • fill gaps in the historical narrative and/or historiography;
  • focus on pedagogy, public history, digital humanities, and other alternative methodologies;
  • foster audience participation, feature pre-circulated papers, or assess the state of a given field.
Individual proposals will be considered, but the program committee gives priority to proposals for complete panels that include a chair and commentator, though the committee reserves the right to alter and rearrange proposed panels and participants. Proposals should be prepared according to the guidelines available under the “Annual Meeting” menu on the website.

The deadline for submissions is December 1, 2017. Proposals should be submitted by email to the program committee co-chairs at shear2018@gmail.com with “SHEAR2018” in the subject line.

For more details, please see the SHEAR annual meeting website.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Recent Prizes, Awards, and Recognition for Business Historians

A few non-BHC awards and honors for folks in the general field of business history:
The World History Association announced that Jonathan Eacott of the University of California Riverside is the co-winner of its 2017 Bentley Book Prize for Selling Empire: India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600-1830.

The Business History Review Editorial Advisory Board has announced that the winner of the 2016 Henrietta Larson Article Award (for the best article in BHR) is Sean H. Vanatta of Princeton University for "Citibank, Credit Cards, and the Local Politics of National Consumer Finance, 1968–1991" (Spring 2016): 57-80. The Vanatta article is currently free to access on Cambridge Core.

Gautham Rau of American University has been named as the new editor of the Law and History Review.

Kenneth Lipartito has been named to the Board of Editors of the American Historical Review; his primary responsibility is modern U.S. history, and he encourages business historians to submit articles to the AHR, "which is increasingly interested in works dealing with economy, business, and capitalism."

Julia Ott of the New School has been named to the Editorial Board of Dissent. She is also the co-director of the Robert L. Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at the New School, which has just received a million-dollar grant to further its programs.

Jessica Ann Levy of Johns Hopkins University has been awarded the Jefferson Scholar/Hagley Library Fellowship in Business and Politics for 2017, the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society at the Hagley Museum and Library has announced. Her dissertation, “From Black Power to Black Empowerment: American Business and the Return of Racial Uplift in the United States and Africa, 1964–1994,” examines the investments made by American business people, government officials, and black entrepreneurs on two continents in promoting free enterprise and reorienting black activism toward the market.

Charles Read, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Cambridge, was awarded both the 2017 Thirsk-Feinstein Dissertation Prize and the T.S. Ashton Prize for the best article in the Economic History Review.

Friday, September 1, 2017

CFP: Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Annual Conference

The next annual conference of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture (OIEAHC) will be held in Williamsburg, Virginia, on June 14-17, 2018. The meeting will celebrate the Omohundro Institute’s 75th anniversary and will assess the past, present, and potential futures for the practices of early American History.
     Proposals are welcome that consider all aspects of early American history, which the OIEAHC takes to include "the adjoining oceans and seas and both continents of the Americas and all of the peoples who lived on or traveled across those waters and territories." Proposals that highlight digital tools, methods, and scholarly projects are also encouraged. Please see the call for papers for more details about the four different format options for sessions: research panels, roundtables, posters, and workshops.
      For questions regarding the proposal process,  please contact Martha Howard at Martha.Howard@wm.edu or 757-221-1115. All proposals, which are to be submitted online, are due by September 29, 2017.



Wednesday, August 30, 2017

New Books of Interest, Late Summer Edition

More new and forthcoming books of interest to business and economic historians, July-September 2017 (and a few we missed):
Antonella Alimento and Koen Stapelbroek, eds., The Politics of Commercial Treaties in the Eighteenth Century: Balance of Power, Balance of Trade (Palgrave, September 2016)

Mehrsa Baradaran, The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap (Harvard University Press, September 2017)

David R. Bellhouse, Leases for Lives: Life Contingent Contracts and the Emergence of Actuarial Science in Eighteenth-Century England (Cambridge University Press, July 2017)

Cary Carson, Face Value: The Consumer Revolution and the Colonizing of America (University of Virginia Press, August 2017)

Theodore Catton, Rainy Lake House: Twilight of Empire on the Northern Frontier (Johns Hopkins University Press, August 2017)

Eli Cook, The Pricing of Progress: Economic Indicators and the Capitalization of American Life (Harvard University Press, September 2017)

Aled Davies, The City of London and Social Democracy: The Political Economy of Finance in Post-war Britain (Oxford University Press, August 2017)

Joshua Clark Davis, From Head Shops to Whole Foods: The Rise and Fall of Activist Entrepreneurs (Columbia University Press, August 2017)

Marian Mathison Desrosiers, John Bannister of Newport: The Life and Accounts of a Colonial Merchant (McFarland, July 2017; pb original)

Peter J. Drake, Merchants, Bankers, Governors: British Enterprise in Singapore and Malaya, 1786–1920 (World Scientific, September 2017)

William M. Fowler, Jr., Steam Titans: Cunard, Collins, and the Epic Battle for Commerce on the North Atlantic (Bloomsbury Publishing, August 2017)

Anthony C. Hotson, Respectable Banking: The Search for Stability in London's Banking and Credit Markets since 1695 (Cambridge University Press, July 2017)

Louis Hyman and Joseph Tohill, eds., Shopping for Change: Consumer Activism and the Possibilities of Purchasing Power (Cornell University Press, June 2017)

Josh Lauer, Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America (Columbia University Press, July 2017)

Kate Moore, The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women (Sourcebooks, May 2017) 

Amanda Porterfield, Darren Grem, and John Corrigan, eds., The Business Turn in American Religious History (Oxford University Press, August 2017)

Gideon Reuveni, Consumer Culture and the Making of Modern Jewish Identity (Cambridge University Press, August 2017)

George Robb, Ladies of the Ticker: Women and Wall Street from the Gilded Age to the Great Depression (University of Illinois Press, September 2017)

Augustus J. Veenendaal, Jr., Smoke over Oklahoma: The Railroad Photographs of Preston George (University of Oklahoma Press, January 2017)

James Wadsworth, ed., The World of Credit in Colonial Massachusetts: James Richards and His Day Book, 1692-1711 (University of Massachusetts Press, September 2017; pb original)

Robert E. Weems, Jr., and Jason Chambers, eds., Building the Black Metropolis: African American Entrepreneurship in Chicago (University of Illinois Press, September 2017)

Richard White, The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896 (Oxford University Press, September 2017)

Monday, August 28, 2017

CFP: “(En)gendering the Atlantic World”

The faculty and students of the Atlantic World Workshop at New York University announce their upcoming conference, “(En)gendering the Atlantic World,” to be held at NYU on April 20-21, 2018. This conference is open to scholars of all ranks, as well as the public. According to the call for papers,
Over the last five decades, historians have demonstrated that focusing on gender enables a deeper understanding of the diversity of human experience, ideologies, and epistemologies that shaped the Atlantic World. This conference aims to convene emerging and established scholars whose work speaks to gender in the Atlantic World between 1400 and 1800. While we welcome papers on any aspect of gender in the Atlantic World, we particularly encourage those that situate enslaved and Native actors within the broader Atlantic context, as well as those that critically consider imperial structures and the archival challenges they produce. 
Among possible topics of specific interest here are
  • Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment 
  • Commerce, Capitalism, Trade 
  • Cultural Production, Material and Sartorial Culture, Consumption 
  • Race, Slavery, Commodification 
  • Labor and Work 
Individual submissions of papers twenty minutes in length are invited. Proposals should include a 200-300 word prospectus and a one-page CV. Please email submissions to Lila Chambers (lila.chambers@nyu.edu) AND Elise A. Mitchell (elise.mitchell@nyu.edu) by October 15, 2017.

Please see the full call for papers for additional information.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Over the Counter: No. 37

Some sites of interest from around the web:
A conference on "Labour Markets and Living Standards in Britain, 1870-1960" was held at the University of Essex in June. The program, with links to some of the papers, is available online.

ESRICanada has produced an interesting GIS map showing the growth of Canadian railroads, 1835-1995.

And Alisha Knight has posted "Putting Them on the Map: Mapping the Agents of the Colored Co-operative Publishing Company," a GIS visualization that traces this Boston company's expansion across the country.

Noam Maggor discusses "Brahmin Boston and the Politics of Interconnectedness" on the Global Urban History blog, drawing on his recent book, Brahmin Capitalism.

This year's Hakluyt Society symposium, taking place at the University of Kent on September 11-12, 2017, is on the topic "Trading Companies and Travel Literature"; the full program is available on the Society's blog.

On his blog "Marginal Revolution," Tyler Cowan wonders when/if there would have been an industrial revolution in the absence of the British one.

On "Five Books," Peter Temin discusses his selection of favorite books in economic history.

Economic history as a subject has been the topic of several recent essays:
On the "Women's History Network," George Campbell Gosling writes about recent scholarship on "Women and Money."

On "Pro-Market," the blog of the Stigler Center at the University of Chicago, Prateek Raj considers "How Markets in Europe Opened Up as Guild Monopolies Declined in the Sixteenth Century."

In a well-illustrated Bloomberg article, "Inside the Vault with Canada's Oldest Banking Secrets," Doug Alexander interviews Bank of Montreal archivist Yolaine Toussaint about the archives' holdings.

In his blog, Nuno Palma considers "How important was colonial trade for the rise of Europe?" [There is also an audio discussion with "Economics Detective Radio" here.]

Duke University's Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library has announced the acquisition of a collection of marketing and promotional posters directed at African Americans, 1967-1984. [Note: the collection is not yet digitized.]

The American Philosophical Society has digitized Benjamin Franklin's Post Office account book, 1748-1752.

A number of journals have recently published special issues and sections of interest, some of it open access, at least temporarily:
Articles in the latest issue of Financial History Review, on "The Financial and Monetary History of South-East Europe," are temporarily open access.

Several essays in the Winter 2016 issue of the Business History Review are temporarily open access, including a special section on Management Consulting, introduced by Christopher McKenna. And the Summer 2017 issue makes available Jeff Fear's memorialization of Christopher Kobrak.

And, although not freely available, the recent issue of Business History (vol. 58, no. 8) is a special issue on the "Narrative Turn and Business History," including essays by Pamela Walker Laird and Andrew Popp and Susanna Fellman.

Similarly, the May 2017 issue of Continuity and Change is a special number on "Merchants and Commercial Conflicts in Europe, 1250–1600." It is not open access. Many readers will be able to access these materials through institutional subscriptions.


Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Preliminary SHOT 2017 Program Now Available

The Society for the History of Technology (SHOT) will hold its 2017 annual meeting on October 26-29 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The preliminary program is now available. In addition to the large number of sessions on the history of technology around the world, the BHC has a special round table (S11), "The BHC at SHOT: Beyond Firms and Machines"; organizers: Xaq Frohlich, Auburn University, Erik Rau, Hagley Museum and Library, and Jonathan Coopersmith, Texas A&M); participants: Hyungsub Choi, Seoul National University; Barbara Hahn, Texas Tech; Richard John, Columbia University; Philip Scranton, Rutgers University; Lee Vinsel, Virginia Tech; and JoAnne Yates, MIT.
     Another session of particular interest is S30, "Ideologies of Industrialization in the Early American Republic," with Merritt Roe Smith as chair and commentator. There will also be a presidential round table in honor of the late Ann Johnson (F12).
    For information about registration and other details, please consult the SHOT annual meeting website.

Monday, August 21, 2017

CFP: APEBH 2018

The 2018 Asia Pacific Economic and Business History (APEBH) Conference will be hosted by the School of History at the University of Tasmania in Hobart on February 15-17, 2018. The conference, under the topic "History from Below: Ordinary Lives in Historical and Comparative Perspective," will bring together researchers in business, economic, and social history and feature new and exciting research from a variety of perspectives covering historical developments in Australia and Asia, as well as in other regions of the world.
      Papers and proposals for sessions are welcome on any topic in economic, social, and business history, including proposals for complete sessions on particular themes. According to the call for papers,
The conference organisers are also particularly interested in attracting papers that examine topics in the context of the Asia-Pacific region and papers that provide an international comparative perspective, especially in relation to pre-contact and settler-economies such as Australia, New Zealand and the wider Pacific. The digital revolution has resulted in unprecedented access to archival records. . . . The digital revolution has also presented challenges. A lot of information does not necessarily equate to good data. New techniques for dealing with messy or fuzzy information or mining digital archives have also played a role in shaping the discipline. . . . There is ample scope for new interpretations, new findings, as well as syntheses of existing work.
All abstracts, proposals for sessions, or papers for refereeing should be emailed to apebh2018@outlook.com by November 17, 2017. For a fuller discussion of the conference theme and additional details, please consult the call for papers.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Full Program Available: 150 Years of Canadian Business History

The Canadian Business History Association/Association canadienne pour l'histoire des affaires (CBHA/ACHA) will hold its next annual conference on September 11-12, 2017, at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. The full program for the meeting, whose theme is "150 Years of Canadian Business History," presented in conjunction with Canada’s sesquicentennial birthday celebrations, is now available on the CBHA/ACHA website. The conference is multi-disciplinary and open to participation by academics, business leaders, professional archivists, and the public. Among the many historians presenting are David Kirsch, Mira Wilkins, Joe Martin, Graham Taylor, Robert Wright, Laurence Mussio, Doug McCalla, and Andrew Smith. 
    For more information about the conference, please see the CBHA/ACHA website.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

CFP: “Revising the Geography of Modern World Histories”

The British Academy and the Department of History at the University of York invite submissions from early career researchers for a two-day workshop and public conference, “Revising the Geography of Modern World Histories,” to be held in York, UK, on February 9-10, 2018. This international event responds to the recent boom in global history, "providing a forum to discuss the challenges and possibilities of writing multi-sited modern histories that encompass fully situated lives and local contexts." For a list of possible topics, please see the full call for papers. The event organizers wish to draw early career scholars who are "stretching the boundaries of their national or disciplinary specializations."
     Proceedings will include small-group workshops to discuss shared challenges and strategies of conducting geographically heterodox historical scholarship, public presentations of works in progress, keynote lectures, and a plenary discussion with public Q&A.
    Applicants must include, along with a 250-word abstract, a list of five works currently most relevant to their research. These titles will be assembled into an actively managed, open-access bibliography on the conference website. All abstracts are due by September 1, 2017, and should be sent in pdf or MS Word format to revising-geography@york.ac.uk. This conference is a collaboration between scholars at the Universities of Nottingham, Sheffield, and York in the UK, and Fordham, Harvard, the New School for Social Research, Northwestern, and Ohio State in the United States.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Digital Exhibits of Interest

A brief round-up of some interesting digitized materials from around the web:
From Harvard University Libraries, a broadside on “Comparison of Products, Population and Resources of the Free and Slave States” (1861).

From the New York Public Library, a collection of cigarette trade cards; nearly 50,000 images, searchable by topic

The John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera at the Bodleian Library is a large and varied source of images, with nearly 74,000 digitized to date.

From the New York Academy of Medicine, a well-illustrated discussion of Pabst Brewing Company's marketing campaign to persuade consumers that its malt extract could cure a range of ailments.

The Framingham History Center has posted an informative and well-illustrated timeline for the now-shuttered Dennison Manufacturing Company.

From the Digital Public Library of America and the University of Denver, "Staking Claims: The Gold Rush in Nineteenth Century America." Other DPLA Exhibits may be found here.
For a vast collection of links to online materials, readers might visit the Internet Archive, a meta-collection of links to digital holdings around the world (though primarily US, UK, and Western Europe). Try, for example, a search of "business directory" in the metadata category.

Friday, August 11, 2017

BHC 2017 Meeting Presenters: Reminder about BEH Online Submissions

Business and Economic History-Online is still accepting papers that were presented at the 2017 Denver meeting for its annual online edition. Papers should be no more than 15 pages in length, single-spaced, and should be submitted as Word files. Any accompanying images or charts should be embedded in the text. Papers should be submitted to behonline2017papers@gmail.com by October 15 for consideration. Questions may be directed to BEH Editor Benjamin Schwantes (Benjamin.schwantes@gmail.com) or Assistant Editor William J. Hausman (wjhaus@wm.edu).
    The full run of BEH Online papers can be found on the BHC website. The entire run of the printed Business and Economic History, 1962-1999, is available as well.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

EBHA 2017: Full Program with Papers

The next annual congress of the European Business History Association (EBHA) begins in two weeks (August 24-26) in Vienna, Austria, hosted by the Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU). The final program for the meeting, whose theme is "Transformation in Business and Society: An Historical Approach," is available online, accompanied by links to the full texts of many of the papers.
    The opening speaker for the congress will be Philipp Blom; his topic is "Freezing Meteors and Congealed Cold: How the Little Ice Age Ushered in Capitalism."
    More details, including information about registration, lodging, and travel, can be found on the congress website.

Monday, August 7, 2017

CFP: New Orleans, John Law, and the Mississippi Company

Detail from Van Keulen, "Carte de la Nouvelle France . . . ," 1720
The inaugural conference of the 18th- and 19th-Century Studies Network will be held on April 26-28, 2018, at the University of Colorado Boulder. The theme will be "New Orleans, Global City (1718 – 2018): The Long Shadow of John Law and the Mississippi Company." According to the call for papers:
It has been almost three hundred years since the first international stock market crash took place in France, Britain, and the Netherlands. A spate of cross-disciplinary conferences and publications have added greatly to our understanding of the impact of the Mississippi and South Sea Bubbles and the Dutch windhandel (trade in wind) on European economies and cultures. The colonial, global, and oceanic dimensions of these events have not been studied as closely. Meant to coincide with the foundation of New Orleans in 1718 by the Compagnie des Indes (aka the Mississippi Company), this interdisciplinary conference will focus on the immediate to long-term impact of Law’s System and the Mississippi Company on the cultures, economies, and environments of New Orleans and surrounding areas. The focus will be on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, but we shall also consider proposals that deal with earlier or later developments so long as they take into account their broader historical context.
The deadline for the submission of individual paper proposals is September 17, 2017. Please send an abstract (300 – 600 words) along with a brief (2 – 3 pages) curriculum vitae to catherine.labio@ colorado.edu. For additional information, please see the full call for papers.

Friday, August 4, 2017

Post-Doc: Global History of Capitalism at Oxford

The Global History of Capitalism project at the University of Oxford is seeking a dedicated Career Development Fellow to join their team to conduct rigorous academic research and to inform debates on the history of capitalism. The program's co-directors (and co-founders) are Christopher McKenna and Rowena Olegario. According to the job posting,
The successful applicant will have an active research interest in the global history of capitalism and be able to work individually and collaboratively with researchers across disciplines. You will conduct relevant archival research as well as field-based research where relevant. You will manage your own academic research and administrative duties, contribute ideas for new projects and collaborate in the presentation of publications. You will also provide teaching relief to one of the Co-Directors and co-design a new undergraduate course in business history. You will hold a relevant doctorate (or show evidence that a doctorate is imminent) and have an excellent knowledge of the languages relating to your specialism. You will be able to demonstrate a strong research record and excellent communication skills along with the ability to teach. An ability to work independently as well as collaboratively within a team is essential.
The post is full-time and fixed term for 3 years; the start date is negotiable but must be no later than January 2018. Applicants are required to submit a research proposal as part of their application. The deadline for applications is noon on September 13, 2017.
    For additional information, please see the job posting on  the Oxford website.
    Questions can be directed to Chris McKenna, chris.mckenna@sbs.ox.ac.uk and/or Rowena Olegario, rowena.olegario@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

CFP: Special Journal Issue on “History of Corporate Finance”

Abe de Jong and Marc Deloof, editors of a special issue of the Journal of Risk and Financial Management (JRFM), have issued a call for papers on the history of corporate finance. They write:
Twenty years ago, the book A History of Corporate Finance by Paul Miranti and the late Jonathan Baskin was published. This book aims to create a synthesis between modern finance theory and historical investigations of corporate finance decisions. In the past two decades, several studies have been published about the history of financial markets, as well as about accounting and banking history. Unfortunately, historical research into corporate finance decisions seems to be limited. The aim of this special issue is to publish new research on the history of corporate finance. 
A workshop to discuss the submissions will be held in Rotterdam in February 2018; it is expected the special journal issue will appear in June 2018.
     Papers must be submitted for the workshop by November 15, 2017. Completed papers are preferred, but early drafts and proposals may be accepted. Submission implies that the paper will be considered for the special issue of JRFM. Please email the text to ajong@rsm.nl and marc.deloof@uantwerpen.be. After the workshop, selected papers will be submitted to JRFM for review. Preference will be given to papers presented and discussed in the workshop, but other papers may also be considered.
    For further information, please see the call for papers on the JRFM website.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Call for Submissions: BHC Book Prizes

Herewith submission details for the BHC's two book prizes:
     The Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference jointly offer the Hagley Prize, awarded to the best book in Business History (broadly defined); the award consists of a medallion and $2,500. The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives. It is particularly interested in innovative studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline. Scholars, publishers, and other interested parties may submit nominations. Eligible books can have either an American or an international focus. They must be written in English and be published during the two years (2016 or 2017 copyright) prior to the award.  The 2017 winner of the Hagley Prize was Destructive Creation: American Business and the Winning of World War II (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) by Mark R. Wilson, University of North Carolina, Charlotte.
    The Ralph Gomory Prize for Business History (made possible by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation) recognizes historical work on the effect business enterprises have on the economic conditions of a country in which they operate. A $5,000 prize is awarded annually. Eligible books are written in English and published in the two years (2016 or 2017 copyright) prior to the award. The 2017 Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference was shared by Johan Mathew of Rutgers University for his book, Margins of the Market: Trafficking and Capitalism across the Arabian Sea (University of California Press, 2016), and Mark R. Wilson, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, for his book, Destructive Creation: American Business and the Winning of World War II.
    For each prize, four copies of the book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the Prize Coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Business History Conference, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington, DE 19807-0630 USA. The deadline for submission for both prizes is November 30, 2017. The 2018 prizes will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, on April 5-7, 2018. Questions may be addressed to Carol Lockman at clockman@hagley.org.

Friday, July 28, 2017

More Business Historians in the News

A few more examples of recent media appearances by business historians:
Andrew Russell and Lee Vinsel had an opinion piece in the New York Times Sunday Review, on "Let's Get Excited about Maintenance!"

Christy Ford Chapin was a recent guest on NPR's "On Point," discussing "Our Hamstrung Health Care System."

Vicki Howard has an essay on the history of Sears, "How Sears Industrialized, Suburbanized, and Fractured the American Economy," published at both Zócalo Public Square and the Smithsonian's "What It Means to Be American" project.

Kim Phillips-Fein writes about "Trump's Austerity Politics" for the New Republic.

The work of Bernardo Bátiz-Lazo was featured in two recent programs marking the 50th anniversary of the ATM: "Happy Birthday, ATMS!" on NPR's "Marketplace" (audio here); and "The ATM at 50" on "The Conversation."

Taylor Jaworski has an essay at VOX, the Centre for Economic Policy Research public policy blog site, on "WWII and the Industrialization of the American South."

Stephen Mihm has more posts for the "Bloomberg View":  "How Summer Vacation Took Hold in the U.S."; and "Americans Are Living as Large as Ever."

Ed Balleisen draws on his recent book Fraud: An American History in a video interview for the UK's "This Is Money."

And, more generally, the Washington Post has launched a forum, "Made by HIstory," that gives historians a chance to weigh in on contemporary issues; among familiar names so far:
Jennifer Delton, "The Left's Diversity Problem"
Kim Phillips-Fein, "How the 1977 Blackout Unleashed New York City's Tough-on-Crime Politics"
Marc-William Palen, "Protectionism 100 Years Ago Helped Ignite a World War; Could It Happen Again?"
The full list is here. [These are behind a pay wall].

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Program: Southern Historical Association, 2017

The Southern Historical Association (SHA) will hold its next annual meeting in Dallas, Texas, on November 9-12, 2017. The preliminary program is now available. Several sessions will be of particular interest to business and economic historians, including those on "The Culture of Capitalism and Slavery" (session 18), "The Value of Family: Capital, Credit, and Care in Antebellum Southern Families" (session 31), "The Old History of Capitalism" (session 46), and "Black Culture, Black Capitalism, and Black Political Activism in the Post-1965 South" (session 49). A full schedule of session titles is available here.
    For more details, please see the SHA annual meeting website.
 

Monday, July 24, 2017

CFP: Deadline Extended for Danish Society for Economic and Social History Conference

The 3rd annual meeting of the Danish Society for Economic and Social History will take place on September 28-29, 2017, at the Copenhagen Business School. The registration fee for the meeting is €70 (€20 for graduate students). Attendees must be a member of the society; information about joining is available on the organization's website.  Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the meeting, and there will be a dinner on the evening of the first day. For more details, please see the conference website.
    The deadline for proposal submissions has been extended to August 7, 2017. Prospective speakers should submit a one-page abstract to Battista Severgnini (bs.eco@cbs.dk). Please note that, although papers on Danish and Nordic economic and social history are particularly encouraged, all topics are welcome. The language of the meeting will be English.
     The Danish Society for Economic and Social History aims to promote the study of economic and social history in Denmark, as well as scholars in Denmark and abroad who are working on Danish economic and social history.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Program Available: British Group of Early American Historians Conference

View of Boston Harbor, 1770, by Franz Habermann
The British Group of Early American Historians (BGEAH) will hold its annual conference at the University of Portsmouth on August 31-September 3, 2017. Drawing on Portsmouth’s historic significance as a port town, this year’s conference theme is: “Land and Water: Port Towns, Maritime Connections, and Oceanic Spaces of the Early Modern Atlantic World.” The draft program for the meeting, which has several sessions on merchants, trade, and the early modern economy, has now been posted. In addition to regular sessions, there will be two keynote addresses, by Geoffrey Plank of the University of East Anglia, and Mark A. Peterson, of the University of California Berkeley.
    For more information about the meeting and registration details, please see the conference website.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

CFP: EABH Workshop on “The Data Dilemma”

The European Association for Banking and Financial History (EABH) invites submissions for its next workshop, "The data dilemma: a risk or an asset? Business, academic and regulator perspectives on the past, present and future of data in the finance sector." From the call for papers:
Data about the finance sector is growing exponentially and storing it is becoming easier. Businesses are excited about the commercial possibilities of 'Big Data'; academics are relishing the research potential of deep data archives and regulators are hoping for a fuller view of systemic risk and stability. Will it all turn out well though? The current reality of massive data stores is often no more than massive cost and complexity. The workshop will explore how we got here with data and where we go next. Ultimately, can a meeting of business, academics and regulators resolve the data dilemma and find a way to turn a risk into an asset?
The workshop will take place on November 10, 2017, at the Westin Zagreb Hotel in Zagreb, Croatia, parallel to the international conference INFuture2017: Integrating ICT in Society (http://infoz.ffzg.hr/INFuture).
    Those interested in participating should send an abstract (400-500 words) and a short CV no later than August 31, 2017, to: g.massaglia@bankinghistory.org. The workshop committee consists of Jan Booth (DEFRA), Carmen Hofmann (EABH), and Hrvoje Stančić (University of Zagreb). Please consult the full call for papers for additional details.

Monday, July 17, 2017

CFP: “The Many Fourteenth Amendments”

On the 150th Anniversary of the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, the Department of History at the University of Miami, in Coral Gables, Florida, invites scholars to join a research symposium on the causes, consequences, and living legacies of this amendment. The conference will open on Thursday March 1, 2018 with a keynote address by Professor Dylan Penningroth, Professor of History and Law at U.C. Berkley. Four subsequent panels will be dedicated to different elements of the Fourteenth Amendment. It will conclude on March 3, 2018 with a roundtable discussion among the chairs of each panel.
The organizers solicit individual papers that will be appropriate for one of the following panels:
  • Panel 1: Making a New Constitution: Chair: Steven Hahn, Professor of History, New York University 
  • Panel 2: Capitalism, Corporatism, and Conservatism: Chair: Naomi Lamoreaux, Stanley B. Resnor Professor of Economics and History, Yale University 
  • Panel 3: Birthright Citizenship and Immigration in a Globalized America: Chair: Mae Ngai, Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History, Columbia University 
  • Panel 4: Equal Protection and Civil Rights: Chair: Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Daniel PS Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School 
Applications from scholars at every stage of their careers are welcome. Limited travel funds will be available to conference participants. Paper proposals should include a short c.v. and an abstract of no more than 250 words that describes the research to be presented and makes explicit the link with the larger theme of the panel. Applicants should e-mail their proposals to amendmentconference@gmail.com by September 15, 2017. All questions or inquiries should also be sent to that address.
    The full call for papers can be found here.